Shivering on the 49th Parallel
Tuesday, 20 March 2012
First post of the new year! also can't be arsed to install WL Writer so doing this in the web form. blech. :) One of my "projects" for 2012 is to suss out DirectAccess, a transparent "VPN-less" secure connection back to the mother ship from a roaming corporate laptop. On paper it sounds pretty good, but from a demonstration point of view, it ranks up there with watching grass grow or paint dry. When set up and configured, a laptop (or desktop I suppose) out of the office and off the corporate network can access network resources behind the firewall. Going the other way, IT can centrally control corporate laptops out in the field via Group Policy, WSUS and other technologies. To give a demo, you'd take your laptop off-campus, fire it up, log in... and... use it... not much of a demo :) the stuff going on behind the scenes is interesting, but not for the average person. My engine, however, gets running. I ordered up an HP Microserver last month to try this out on. I suppose I could have installed 2008 R2 on any old computer kicking around, provided it had two network ports on it, but I also wanted to do a hands-on with this little server. The HP Microserver is ridiculously cheap for what it is: an HP ProLiant server. it's about half the size of a breadbox and has four non-hot-swap SATA drive bays, two memory slots, a PCIe x16 and and a PCIe x1 half-height slot, a 5.25" drive bay for an optical or tape drive and one large low-rpm fan on the back so it's really quiet. All that for about $400. I bumped up the price somewhat by doubling the RAM and adding a server NIC card to get a few more network ports on it, but it was still under $1000. Putting a copy of Windows Server on it is where most of the expense comes from. Since this is a test, I put a TechNet/MSDN copy on it and fired it up. There are a lot of pre-requisites for setting up DirectAccess including a good CA/PKI setup, and probably the most difficult part: 2 consecutive public IP addresses that don't end in 09-10. I've got all that covered now, so my next step will be to make some changes to Active Directory, my edge firewalls and then I can try it out!
Tuesday, 20 March 2012 08:28:53 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) | Comments [2] | Active Directory | Hardware | Microsoft | Networking | Servers | Windows#
Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Last year I set up a Windows Server 2008 Core server. It was a Hyper-V virtual machine, it was minimum-spec, it didn’t do much other than be a second Domain Controller on the network so I hardly ever had to interact with it. Based on that criteria, and because I wanted to see what it was like, I installed Windows Server 2008 Core.

Windows Server 2008 Core if you’re not familiar is a Windows server with no windows: when you log in, you get a command prompt, and that’s it.

Configuring it after installing was a bit of a bear, because instead of clicking anything, you had to learn, know and type the commands into the terminal, along with all the arguments/switches. I got it set up, configured, joined to the domain and then promoted to be a domain controller and that was pretty much it. I set it up so that I could use Remote Desktop to connect to it, but what I really wanted to do was use the Server Manager on another server to connect to it and manipulate it that way.

I found out the hard way that you can’t really do that. I did find a piece of software written in Visual Basic called CoreConfigurator which created a text-menu-based configuration helper and it was pretty good. They also had a Version 2 which was written in Powershell that had a bit of a GUI to it… but it wasn’t compatible with Windows Server 2008 (the Vista server, if you will) only Windows Server 2008 R2 (the Windows 7 server). I pretty much dropped it after that, since it was running and I didn’t need to do anything to it.

Eventually I upgraded it to Server 2008 R2 when my licensing allowed me to and then I could use CoreConfigurator V2.0. Remote management still wasn’t working, despite the server’s command-line status updates to the contrary. Again, it was working and I had more important things to do.

Today I was trying to track down something (seemingly) entirely unrelated. Some clients could access a DFS share on the domain, and others could not. I followed the trail to the Domain Controller (DC1) and checked DNS services, and they were all fine. I then looked at DC1’s DNS servers and it was pointing at DC2 (the Server Core) so I opened it up and checked it out. I thought to myself “Wouldn’t it be nice if I could control DC2 with the Server Manager on DC1?” so I decided to take another run at it.

On DC2 I entered winrm quickconfig to see what was configured. As expected, it said:
WinRM already is set up to receive requests on this machine.
WinRM already is set up for remote management on this machine.

So I tried “Connect to another computer” in Server Manager and… bonk. “Server Manager cannot connect to server_name. Click retry to try to connect again.” opening the details tab had more detail, but it’s pretty much all gibberish even to me. “Connecting to remote server failed with the following error message: The WS-Management service cannot process the request. The resource URI ...://schemas.microsoft.com/powershell/Microsoft.ServerM... was not found in the WS-Management catalog. The catalog contains the metadata that describes resources, or logical endpoints.” Right.

I started with the error code, and then the hex code and ultimately ended up at a Microsoft KnowledgeBase article that hit the nail right on the head.

Error message in Windows Server 2008 R2 or in Windows 7 when you try to connect to a remote server: "Server Manager cannot connect to <server_name>"

Following this article, I typed sconfig from the command-line on the server core, chose item 4 “Configure Remote Management” and then option 3 “Allow Server Manager Remote Management”. It then re-configured Win-RM (which was already configured correctly) but interestingly added three new rules! It didn’t say what those rules were, but after restarting the server (because I had to enable PowerShell) I was able to connect to the server using Server Manager from any of my other servers or my Windows 7 laptop.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011 12:35:39 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) | Comments [0] | Tech | Active Directory | Microsoft | Networking | Servers | Windows#
Monday, 30 August 2010

About a year ago or so, I tried to enable SNMP monitoring on m SonicWall TZ170. SNMP is useful for monitoring things like bandwidth usage (by port… so in the TZ170’s case it would tell me how much traffic this hour/day/week/month/year/etc had been funneled through the LAN connection and each of the WAN connections) I wrestled with it for a week or so, failed and gave up. I read the documentation, I configured everything correctly (according to the docs) and… nothing.

Earlier this summer, my TZ170 started flaking out. It would stop responding (like a reboot) for 30 seconds or so. Two times this morning, another time in the afternoon, again overnight… and when it did it took down both internet connections, incoming and outgoing email and all the inter-office VPN links. Not a great situation. By the time anyone noticed and called, it would be back up again. The TZ170 has been discontinued for awhile now, and I wasn’t even able to get any more from a used/recertified reseller in California that had kept me going for awhile. Fortunately, the newer TZ210 is backwards compatible with the TZ170s AND I was able to take advantage of the competitive upgrade to get one cheap cheap, if I signed up for three years of SonicWALL services (content filtering, gateway antivirus, etc).

The TZ210 is great. Each of it’s 8 ports can be configured as a LAN or a WAN port which gives you a lot of flexibility. With the help of a local Sonicwall Partner/technician we were even able to export the settings on the old TZ170 and import it onto the TZ210 and then just re-configure a few things and be back up and running in an hour or so, rather than a day or so of re-creating all the settings and VPN tunnels manually. We even upgraded the VPN tunnels to a better encryption scheme and documented everything (now where did I save that text file…)

Now that I had 8 more-configurable ports, I decided to give the SNMP monitoring another shot. I installed PRTG freeware version on a spare computer, downloaded the MIBs from SonicWall’s support site and then converted/imported them into PRTG as OIDs (Most of these TLAs are beyond even my knowledge…) I added a new device in PRTG and then attached some sensors to it… I gave it the IP address of the SonicWall TZ210, selected SNMP and… it failed.

I went into the SonicWall web interface and confirmed that the network interface’s properties had the SNMP checkbox checked, and that on the Administration tab, that SNMP was configured and had the IP address of the PRTG computer entered and that the community string was set correctly, but it still failed.

Using some of the PRTG testing tools, there was flat-out no response from the SonicWall on port 161 or 162 (the default SNMP ports). Without breaking out a packet sniffer, I deduced that the SonicWALL was dropping the packets. I went to the Firewall config and added a rule allowing LAN to LAN using protocol SNMP. Still nothing.

At that point (late last week) I gave up (again). I did some Googling and came across a couple of entries on Experts Exchange, but even though I have a login it wouldn’t show me the answer, instead telling me I needed to become an expert or pay $12.95/month to see the answer. Lame. That’s new…

I bitched about it on Twitter, stating it was too bad that I couldn’t automatically append a “-Experts-exchange.com” to all my queries to make sure I didn’t get any (now useless) search results from their site. Someone responded that if you follow a link from Google or Bing directly to Experts-Exchange, it will show the answer if you scroll down past all the ads… which is the behavior I was used to, but wasn’t happening on these particular articles.

I tried the SonicWALL forums, and people were using SNMP, so it wasn’t broken or anything… Ultimately I opened a support ticket with SonicWALL (hey I paid for 3 years of it, may as well make use of it!) and they called me first thing this morning and got it sorted out.

I'm not sure if SonicWALL does things differently from the SNMP spec… but then again I’m not an SNMP expert who would know the difference. Here’s the gist of what Darshan the tech went over with me:

  • You DO need the IP address of the system/software that’s monitoring the SNMP does have to be entered on the SNMP configuration page.
  • You DO need the checkbox on the network interface page does have to have SNMP checked.
  • You DO NOT need to create a firewall rule allowing SNMP traffic from LAN to LAN on the firewall. When it’s configured correctly, it auto-creates one that you can’t change.
  • You DO have to use the SonicWALL MIBs that are specific to each model of firewall.

We did end up doing a packet capture and seeing that the SNMP packets were being dropped, which led us back to the Firewall config page and removal of the custom firewall rule. Once we did that (and I think this is the key) we removed the SNMP checkbox from the interface config, let the firewall save/update it’s settings and then re-enabled it. After that, PRTG magically worked.

Now I just have to figure out which settings and ports I want to monitor and get those set up in PRTG! Smile

Monday, 30 August 2010 08:13:49 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) | Comments [2] | Tech | Hardware | Networking#
Wednesday, 18 August 2010

I’ve written before about what a huge, horrible, steaming pile of horse shit you have to wade through to install a 32-bit (x86) driver on a 64-bit (x64) server. It’s SO counter-intuitive it makes me want to scrape my eyeballs out with a grapefruit spoon and then chop off my fingers so I won’t be able to see a computer or type ever again.

In a nutshell, you need to have a 32-bit client running Vista or Windows 7, install “the full meal deal” printer driver on that client, THEN connect to the 64-bit server’s printer share (\\server\printer) and then tell it to use the existing driver. That will then UPLOAD the driver from the client machine to the server and make it available to other 32-bit clients who try to connect to it.

Today I’m in the opposite situation. I PURPOSELY set up a 32-bit Windows Server 2008 (not R2, which is 64-bit only) to run my print queues because 99.9% of my network is 32-bit Windows XP clients and I didn’t want to have to go through this rigmarole for every single one of them. *MY* laptop, however is running Windows 7 Professional 64-bit and it’s unable to connect to the shared printers on the 32-bit server.

Rather than duplicate the steps above, since I was feeling saucy and experimental, I went the other(old) way around. On the 32-bit server, I opened the printer properties, went to the sharing tab and clicked on Additional Drivers. I checked the 64-bit box and it asked me for a driver. I clicked Browse. I navigated to the folder where I had the 64-bit driver .inf file for the printer, selected it and clicked OK.

Fast-forward a few seconds and the window closed, and the box was checked. Just like that. Just how it USED to be in older versions of Windows Server. I went back to my laptop, tried to connect to the printer, and this time instead of failing and saying “Driver Unknown” or even worse, the  0x0004005 error which is one of the more generic error codes you’ll ever see. (I always thought it was “Access Denied”, but that’s just ONE of the errors it COULD be.) Up came a NEW dialog box. Do you trust this printer driver? Yes, of course I do. Just like that, it mapped the printer, using the 64-bit driver on the 32-bit server.

If it’s so bloody easy to do that with a 64-bit driver on a 32-bit server, why the HELL is it SO difficult and bass-ackwards to do it on a 32-bit driver with a 64-bit server??

Wednesday, 18 August 2010 10:09:35 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) | Comments [0] | Tech | Deployment | Hardware | Microsoft | Networking | Servers | Windows#
Tuesday, 13 July 2010

Last Friday, one of the workers here in the office came over to me and said that he got an error in his inbox about a message that had been delayed. Not permanently, just delayed. I said OK, leave it, it’ll retry again for the next 48 hours and looked into it.

I connected to the Exchange 2010 server and opened Exchange Management Console and went straight to the Toolbox and clicked on Queue Viewer. There they were, pretty ducks all in a row all with DNS FAILURE errors. Huh. Interesting. I saw this happen once before when we were setting the server up. The DNS server it was set to use was offline, so no DNS resolution meant it didn’t know where to send the mail. Thinking this was the case this time, I checked the Network Adapter settings and saw that the preferred DNS server was the other VM “next to” the Exchange 2010 VM and the secondary was set to “my” DNS server here in my office.

I checked my DNS server first, just to make sure the service was running, and it was. I then checked the DNS server that was it’s primary and it, too, was running. Mystery. Nslookup queries failed and timed out even for common domain names. Not good. This was happening on both DNS servers.

I called in a support ticket (this was Friday at 4:00) and found out that the Exchange SysAdmin was on vacation and not back until Monday, and he was being covered by another Exchange SysAdmin on East Coast time. She called me back about 20 minutes later and we worked on it for a good 40 minutes with no resolution. She figured that since the DNS server was rebooted, it had been unable to contact the

PDC role holder and authorize/activate itself and that there must be a problem with the VPN between my network and hers.

This seemed like a valid diagnosis, as the other Administrator here at work told me that our router had been failing every 30-40 minutes, but recovering after a minute or two and was obviously dying. Yikes. This caused a little panic as ALL my sites use the same router/firewall and they’re discontinued and I hadn’t yet created a contingency plan to replace them.

She escalated the ticket up to tier 3 networking support, who tested the VPN and said that everything was up on their end, but they couldn’t ping my side of the VPN, therefore there was a problem with the VPN and it was on my end. (naturally). I don’t know too much about the router/firewalls we use here, I’ve been slowly learning as I went, but diagnostics and troubleshooting was beyond the scope of my knowledge beyond “well the blinky light is green, not red, so it’s up”.

Further compounding the matter was that this VPN was temporary, because we were switching it on Monday from an Internet VPN to a private, routed DSL connection into their MPLS network. That ADSL modem was plugged in to power and phone, but not into the LAN as it was just for testing.

At some point over the weekend, one of the emails from their networking people said that they could ping as far as 192.168.0.252 but no further. This was when the light bulb went off in my head. .252 is the address of the new ADSL router, NOT the VPN endpoint! Their network techs were trying to reach my network via a device that was physically unplugged! I thought it was odd, since I was connecting from home via VPN through the same device and it was up.

Monday came and I plugged the DSL modem into the LAN and disabled the Internet VPN connection from my network to theirs, created a new route for all traffic destined for their network to use this new gateway and everything seemed to be working. Outlook clients in my LAN segment were connecting via the MPLS network, verified by the IP addresses on a traceroute… I could Remote Desktop the virtual servers in their network… everything seemed to be working, but their network guys could still not ping my LAN from the MPLS gateway, even though I could ping back to my network from the Virtual servers (which was the important part anyway) so that left me with the DNS problem, which was still ongoing and some people were now starting to get NDRs because the 48 hours had timed out.

I started with my own laptop, and did an nslookup query. request timed out. Damnit! I checked the DNS server, the service was running, I restarted it, it still failed. I looked at the event log and there were a bunch of “DNS server encountered an invalid domain name” errors, but the errors were coming from all these weird IP addresses that were not in my network. I then thought that perhaps it was the forwarding that wasn’t working, based upon a few results that came up when I searched that error message online. I checked the forwarders on my DNS server and found that they were set to use two Shawcable.net servers, one of which resolved to a hostname and both of which did not respond to an nslookup query. How on earth did I end up with two (seemingly) random Shaw Cable DNS servers for my forwarders when I have a Telus ADSL connection in this office? that could explain why they didn’t respond; my IP address wasn’t in the Shaw Cable network!

I changed the two forwarders to 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220 which is OpenDNS. I then restarted the DNS Server service and BAM! nslookups all worked. I then went back to the Exchange server and tried again. Still failed. OK, I have an idea of what’s going on now, so I connected to the DNS server there and checked it’s event logs. Similar messages, different addresses. I opened the DNS snap-in and went right to the forwarders. The two forwarders on this server were two Telus servers! This was a co-located (sort of) Virtual Server within an ISP, so how did I end up with Telus servers there?! I changed those two forwarders to OpenDNS and restarted the DNS Server service and as I was opening a command prompt window on the Exchange 2010 server to try an nslookup again, I could see the emails in the retry queue (which was still open) begin to flow out. I tried nslookup queries on a couple domain names that I knew were in the retry queue and they all answered lightning fast as non-authoritative responses.

SO in the end, I figured it out myself, but the million-dollar question that I can’t answer is HOW did my local DNS server get a Shaw DNS server as a forwarder, and how did the VM DNS server in the datacenter get a Telus one??

Tuesday, 13 July 2010 08:44:13 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) | Comments [0] | Tech | Active Directory | Mail Server | Microsoft | Networking | Servers | Windows#
Wednesday, 17 March 2010

There are a lot of blogs, classes, tutorials, how-tos, workshops, links and opinions on how to best deploy Windows 7 using the new Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010. What there’s a distinct lack of is how to make these tools work with XP which most of us are still using. I am planning to move to Windows 7 x64 later this year, but we have a software dependency on 32-bit Windows that we have to get past first (and no, Windows XP mode won’t cut it for this app)

I spent most of yesterday downloading software and patches. the Windows Automated Installation Kit 2.0 (which supports Win7, 2008 R2 and back to XP) was a 1.7gb iso file which took a couple hours.

Eventually last night I was ready to start the capture of an existing Windows XP box that I could then deploy to the other new machines.

This morning I tried to do it and it failed. I assumed it was permissions-based since the error was 0x00004005 which I know from past experience is “Access is denied”. After sorting that out, it still failed. Trolling through forums from a Google search, I found some people were able to get it to work by using the IP address of the deployment server, or sometimes the FQDN, rather than just "\\server\share$”

I rebooted, opened Windows Explorer and navigated to \\192.168.x.x\share$ and when it asked me to authenticate (because this is a workgroup computer and the share is a domain resource) I entered my credentials and then I double-clicked the litetouch.vbs script to kick off the imaging process. This time it seemed to work, it downloaded the WinPE files needed, ran sysprep and then rebooted to capture the image… except that’s when it failed.

Digging into the winpeinit.log I saw that there’s no NIC. Awesome. Great. I figured that the driver for the NIC would be part of the Windows image, but I overlooked the fact that the WinPE boot-time would also need the NIC in order to connect to a network share and create the disc image there, and the new machines would need the NIC driver to connect to that same share and copy the image down to the local computer.

No biggie, except that the computer is now stuck in a loop booting into WinPE rather than back into Windows XP. I injected the driver for the NIC into the deployment share’s Out Of Box Drivers and rebuilt/updated the deployment (which also adds the NIC driver to the winpe.iso file). All that’s left to do now is to PXE boot the machine which will download the new winpe (now with more NIC flavor) and start over… except now my PXE server isn’t configured properly :p

Wednesday, 17 March 2010 11:27:45 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) | Comments [0] | Tech | Deployment | Microsoft | Networking | Servers | Windows#
Tuesday, 23 February 2010

How come a “printing system” has to be a 300mb download or CD ordered by mail? I’m all for having that as an OPTION, but for servers and for shared printers, all I need is a driver and that can probably still fit on a floppy disk… if my computers and servers still had floppy drives, but that’s another post!

I already posted about 32-bit printing in an increasingly 64-bit world, and my medium-term solution for that was to stand up a 32-bit Windows Server 2008 VM and use that as a print server.

This post is the next step: printer drivers. Specifically migrating printer drivers from one server to another. For the small amount of printers I have to manage (three printers and two plotters in this office) or even the amount of printers (queues) at my last job (about 40) it’s not so difficult to do it manually. I did just that when we moved into a new building at my last job and stood up a VM just for print queues. Pretty straightforward, really: download the latest printer drivers from the manufacturers web site, unpack them to a network location, Add Printer from the printers window/control panel, new local port, new TCP/IP port, punch in the printer’s IP address, have disk, browse, click, select… done. 40 times. A wee bit time consuming. For this migration here I only had the six, so it should be even easier. But what if the newer version of a printer driver doesn’t work properly with your as-configured software?

That’s where I am right now. We have a Kyocera CM3232 photocopier/printer/scanner/fax. It’s a big one with it’s own onboard cost accounting and “proper” network scanning & faxing. It does color and black & white and prints on up to 11x17 paper (although not borderless printing). On the old OLD server, printing CAD drawings from Acrobat Reader plots properly. On the new-old server, it didn’t. There were some weird issues where drawings would not be rotated based on the settings you selected in Acrobat, but if you left Acrobat’s settings on Portrait but clicked Advanced Print Properties and changed it to landscape on the driver settings, it would work. Not very intuitive and sure to be the cause of plenty of helpdesk calls.

We tried a different driver, we tried an old driver from a CD that presumably came with the printer and nothing seemed to work. In the end, I re-pointed everyone’s printers back to the old server and removed the queues from the new-old server… but that old server isn’t going to last much longer and it’s not easy to find parts for an old IBM X-series Pentium III tower server, and having a single Windows 2000 Server in the mix is also holding the rest of the network back.

The new-old server blew up in December. No big deal for printing, but HUGE FUCKING DEAL for everything else. I managed to get it up and running again, Frankenstein-style and convert it to a virtual machine before shutting it down for good and sending the carcass to the recycling center.

That new one is here, and one of it’s roles is hosting a Windows Server 2008 32-bit VM for print queues, so I’m back to trying to make the new server play nice and plot drawings properly… the Windows Server 2008 driver for the copier is doing the same weird things the 2003 driver was doing… If only there was a way to migrate those queues, drivers and ports over to a new server… oh wait! there is! Hallelujah I think I hear a choir of angels singi—wait, what? that only really works for moving from NT4 to 2000? It wasn’t really updated for 2003, 2003 R2 or 2008? The tool has been retired? Oh good grief!

Fortunately there’s a new version built-in to Server 2008 and Server 2008 R2. You access it from Print Management Administrative Tool, as opposed to the Printers control panel applet. From there you can add the old server as a network print server, right-click it and export printers to a file… then right-click your new server and import printers from a file. I’m in the process of doing that right now, and will be testing it with CAD drawings later today. Fingers crossed.

Tuesday, 23 February 2010 11:43:52 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) | Comments [0] | Microsoft | Networking | Servers | Windows#
Friday, 12 February 2010

(or a 64-bit domain anyway)

Hooray! 32-bit is dead! Long live 64-bit! … … … not exactly.

While there are more 64-bit machines out there now than there were a year ago and tons more than a few years ago, a lot of businesses are still firmly entrenched in 32-bit Windows XP. I know we are.

We’re a pretty good example of someone who SHOULD make the leap to a 64-bit OS. If there’s one segment of the market that supports 64-bit and is extremely memory-hungry, it’s CAD work. And we’re all about CAD work. I’ve recently upgraded all the computers to 4GB of RAM and standardized them on one video card (nVidia Quadro FX 580 512MB), they’re not taking full advantage of that 4GB of memory because the 32-bit XP Professional can’t address it all. Even with the /3GB switch in the win.ini file, that just means acad.exe can use more than the 2GB limit per process… but I’m getting off topic.

When I started here in Q4 of 2008, I took one look at the “datacenter” and my jaw dropped. The main file server was an old IBM x-server with a Pentium III and a whopping 768mb of RAM and a couple 160GB hard drives in RAID1. The web/intranet server was an even older one. Both were running Windows Server 2000. The Domain Controller was newer, it at least had Windows Server 2003 on it, but it was consumer-grade, non-redundant components in a 2U rackmounted case.

Before Christmas rolled around I had replaced the ancient file server with a pair of Supermicro SuperServers with Quad-core Xeons, 4GB of RAM and 5x1TB SATA2 drives in RAID5 configurations and added an LTO-4 tape backup to the mix. Between Christmas and New Years, the web server died so I replaced that one with another Supermicro identical to the first two, but with just 2x250 and 2x500GB drives in RAID1. All of these servers were running Windows Server 2008 Standard x64.

This led me to a major problem: I was able to install printer drivers for each of the printers on the servers themselves, but with the 64-bit drivers. Client computers (XP Pro SP2 x86) tried to connect and failed because they couldn’t use the 64-bit drivers. In the old days, you could go to the sharing tab of the printer properties and click “Additional Drivers” and that was pretty much that, but cross-architecture is a little more squirrelly, and the solution is counter-intuitive.

Here is how to provide a 32-bit driver in the Additional Drivers page on a 64-bit server:

Step 1: Install the 64-bit driver on the server itself and make sure that you can print.

Step 2: On a 32-bit client (I used XP Pro) download and unpack the drivers for the desired printer (in my case it was an HP Laserjet 4600).

Step 3: Open Windows Explorer and navigate to your printer share: \\64-bit_server\ and then double-click Printers and Faxes.

Step 4: Right-click the desired printer and  select Connect. It will do it’s thing and then Uh-Oh.. where’s the driver? It will ask you to provide a driver. Browse to your local folder where you’ve stashed the .inf files for the printer and let it install. Print a test page to make sure it’s working on your computer.

Step 5: On the server, right-click the printer you just added and select Properties. Click the Sharing tab, and then click the “Additional Drivers” button. Click to check the “x86” button for 2000/XP and click OK. The server will then request the x86 versions of the files FROM your local workstation and upload them TO the server.

This is the back-asswards part that tripped me up. You’re actually uploading the driver TO the server so it’s able to them DOWNLOAD it to OTHER x86 clients that request it.

Step 6: Click ok, ok, ok, all the way back out and you should be good to go.

Friday, 12 February 2010 17:00:00 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) | Comments [2] | Tech | Microsoft | Networking | Servers | Windows#
Saturday, 23 January 2010
>(I wrote this almost a year ago and it’s been sitting in my drafts folder since then. It’s still an outstanding issue and I haven’t figured it out yet)
Saturday, 23 January 2010 18:36:00 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) | Comments [3] | Mail Server | Networking#
Thursday, 21 January 2010

(This is a crosspost from the Autodesk Discussion/forum website that I was participating in)

Since I started here 15 months ago, I've been wary of messing with NLM because I didn't understand it. I still don't know all of it, but I know a lot more thanks to Travis and the rest of the contributors NLM isn't as big of a scary monster as it was before! There were Group Policy entries in my domain that were specifying an environment variable for the local license server (distributed model) by IP address, and then the next biggest office as a secondary, and third biggest as tertiary--by IP address. So for example if you logged in to a computer in site A your environment variable would be ADSK_FLEX_LICENSE=@192.168.1.2;@192.168.2.2;@192.168.3.2 It worked, it was working, so I had no motivation to change it.

While checking some things out on Travis' suggestions, I changed it to a server name, so on my test computer in site C, the environment variable was ADSK_FLEX_LICENSE=@SiteC_server;@SiteA_Server;@SiteB_Server and it worked. I then changed all my environment variables to computer (NetBIOS) names.

That sorted out 4 of my 5 offices, just the 3rd one, Site C users were still grabbing licenses from sites other than their own. Further investigation showed that two of the users who were using the wrong license server hadn't logged out and back in for some time. (this prompted a quick meeting with the CAD Manager and the Sustainability Committee to make changes to inactivity timers and lock computers after one hour, log users off after 2 and go to system standby after 3 hours outside of regular business hours). When one of the problem users logged back in and started up AutoCAD, they did not get a no license error, but rather Autocad seemed to hang for a good 60-90 seconds with an hourglass... after that AutoCAD started up normally and she was on the correct license server. I did the same thing to the the other user and got similar results.

So in the end, there was some sort of networking issue (which is still undiagnosed) that was causing clients to skip over their own license server, but changing environment variables from IP address to NetBIOS names fixed the problem.

Later in 2010 we may implement other changes recommended here and move to a single/redundant license server instead of the distributed model.

Thursday, 21 January 2010 10:25:31 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) | Comments [0] | Autocad | Networking#
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